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Thursday, October 7, 2010

Wild Mushrooms Take The Stage in Ravioli and Pork

Recently, I received a package from Marx Foods containing five different kinds of dried wild mushrooms.  My mission was to create a wonderful new recipe using one or all of the varieties.  The varieties included chanterelle, porcini, matsusake, lobster and black trumpet mushrooms.  I spent about 20 minutes just smelling the open bags.  It was like Christmas!  My sons all thought I was nuts.

So, after doing a bit of research, I came up with two different recipes.  One is vegetarian and one is completely carnivorous...to the extreme.  I couldn't decide which I liked better, so I am posting them both.
The first is a homemade ravioli with butternut squash in the pasta dough, filled with lobster mushrooms, ricotta, asiago, and marscapone.  They are covered in a butter/truffle oil sauce with garlic, more lobster mushrooms and summer savory.

Three Cheese Butternut Ravioli with Lobster Mushrooms:
For the ravioli: 
3 cups AP flour
4 eggs
1/2 cup cooked, pureed butternut squash
1/2 tsp Italian seasoning
Pour the flour in a large mixing bowl.  Make a well in the center and add the eggs, squash and herbs.  Mix with a fork, until a ball forms.  Knead on a floured surface for 5 minutes or until the dough becomes elastic and smooth.  Cover and let rest while you make the filling.

For the filling: 
1/2 ounce dried lobster mushrooms, reconstituted with hot water, chopped fine
1 16 ounce container ricotta cheese
1/4 cup shredded asiago cheese
1/4 cup marscapone cheese
1/2 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 tsp salt
1 egg
Mix all ingredients together in a small bowl.

Roll out the dough and form ravioli using this method.  Boil five at a time in gently boiling water.  Drain and serve with butter sauce.  Sprinkle with Parmesan or Romano cheese if desired.

For the Lobster Mushroom Butter Sauce: 
5 Tbsp butter
2 Tbsp truffle oil
1/3 cup white wine
1 Tbsp minced garlic
1 tsp dried summer savory
1/2 ounce dried lobster mushrooms, reconstituted in hot water, chopped in small pieces
1/2 tsp white pepper
Heat butter and oil over medium heat and saute the garlic and lobster mushrooms for five minutes.  Add the wine and seasonings.  Let it simmer gently for a few minutes and serve.



For the second dish using these wonderful dried mushrooms, I brined a pork loin, then  wrapped it in bacon to roast and then served each slice with a Chanterelle cream sauce.  By grinding the dried mushrooms, I was able to slip these babies right by the mushroom haters in my family (hehehe).  Obviously, it is the texture and not the taste that they don't like.

Bacon Wrapped Agave Pork Loin with Chanterelle Cream:
2-3 pound boneless pork loin roast
1/3 cup salt
1/3 cup agave nectar
8 whole juniper berries
6 whole cloves
1 tsp dried rosemary
water (for brine)
6-8 ounce package bacon
Place the pork roast in a sealable plastic bag along with the salt, agave, juniper, cloves, rosemary and enough water to cover the roast (about 2 cups).  Seal the bag and place it in a bowl (just in case it leaks) and refrigerate for 4 hours.  After brining, remove the meat from the bag.  Overlap the bacon strips in the baking dish you are going to roast the meat in.  Place the roast on top and bring the bacon up over the top of the meat.  Carefully, flip the roast over so the ends of the bacon are under the meat and the top has a pretty overlapping pattern of bacon on top.  Roast in a 325 degree oven until the internal temperature of the meat reaches 173 degrees.  Bring it out of the oven, tent it with foil and let it rest 10 minutes before slicing.  Slice and serve with Chanterelle cream sauce.

For the Chanterelle Cream Sauce: 
1 ounce dried chanterelle mushrooms
3 Tbsp butter
1/4 cup flour
1/4 tsp garlic powder
2 cups heavy cream
3 Tbsp fresh chives, chopped
1/3 cup white wine
1/8 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper
salt to taste
In a saute pan, melt the butter.  Add the flour, stirring to form a roux, browning the flour slightly.  Slowly add the wine, stirring until thickened to prevent lumps.  Add the remaining ingredients and heat through.

28 comments:

Monet said...

Give me some ravioli, please! Wow. This looks like the perfect meal for me...unique artisan mushrooms and deliciously creamy ravioli. I would be in pasta heaven. Thank you for sharing two very creative, mushroom inspired recipes. Great work love!

Belinda said...

You did those 'shrooms right! I thought reading and seeing the first recipe, no way another could beat this...and then...you raise the competition. Nice!

Debbie said...

I tried making my own ravioli and it was a mess, I think I need one of those ravioli pans because yours look amazing! I can't wait to try it, thanks! Oh and love the lobster sauce :-)

The Cilantropist said...

Wow, both of these recipes sound fabulous, but I think the ravioli would be my favorite. :) I could eat pasta all day!

katerina said...

Homemade pasta is priceless. I love all types of mushrooms so both recipes are keepers. You did a great job with these mushrooms.

Joanne said...

You did some really fine work with this ravioli. The butternut squash filling sounds divine. A perfect use of those mushrooms!

Drick said...

oh yeah - it's a toss up for me too... both are just so great and different... love both sauces, just mouthwatering reading the ingredients

ButterYum said...

You're making my tummy grumble - especially the pork with chanterelle cream - wow!

:)
ButterYum

Debbie said...

Well yum! That first one sounds so great to me!

Mari @ Once Upon a Plate said...

Oh dear, I could never decide between the two ~ they both look fabulous!

You made me giggle---I can completely relate to opening the bag and smelling that earthy goodness... there is nothing like it!

Thank you for sharing. xo~m

ravienomnoms said...

I love the wild mushrooms and ravioli, that sounds absolutely delicious!

foodies at home said...

Wow! You definitely did those mushrooms justice! Both dishes look incredible!

Sue said...

Your ravioli sounds FANTASTIC!

Pam said...

What a great meal! It all looks delicious and you have tempted me to make ravioli!

All That I'm Eating said...

I wish I had the patience to make that ravioli. It sounds incredible. If you ever make too much, I'd be happy to take some off your hands.

Joy said...

I love this recipe. Especially the Ravioli recipe.

Joseph's Grainery Recipes said...

I'm a sucker for any kind of stuffed pasta. Looks delicious!

Magic of Spice said...

Wow, I adore mushrooms and both of these recipes are fantastic :)

Pacheco Patty said...

I have had ravioli on the brain lately, I enjoyed reading your recipe and can't wait to try it:)

Chef Dennis said...

wow....I love those ravioli's....they must have been so delicious! what a perfect blend of flavors, Butternut squash is becoming a new favorite of mine. The pork looks exquisite!! Marx must be proud of both of your creations!

Chef Bee said...

Yummy! That pork looks wonderful. Great job!

Plan B

Reeni said...

Your ravioli turned out perfect! And they look really delicious. You did amazing things to that pork too! Very creative.

The Mom Chef said...

Even though I'm a meat eater to the extreme, I have to say that I was very drawn to the ravioli. I got those mushrooms from Marx and just used up the last of them in my wild mushroom risotto. They were amazing and that company is fantastic.

Elin said...

Kristen...your ravioli looks great and the bacon wrapped pork loin with chanterelle cream makes me salivates. Awesome ! thanks for sharing the recipes. :)

A SPICY PERSPECTIVE said...

They both look impressive, but the lobster mushroom butter sauce...OMG!

Joyce said...

I love ravioli. Your meal looks amazing. I don't suppose you have any left overs. lol.

Mimi said...

Fabulous! Both the ravioli and the pork tenderloin would be a hit at my house.
Mimi

Momgateway said...

lovely ravioli...loving the mushroom butter sauce

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